Instant Pay for Millennials

Can you imagine getting paid each day that you work? That’s the idea behind Instant Financial’s app, which puts cash in the hands of workers on the same day they work. This program attempts to reduce absenteeism and employee turnover for restaurant chains.

At the end of each workday, employees may take 50 per cent of their pay for that day and transfer it to an instant account; the other half is paid at the end of the regular pay period. Funds in the Instant account may be accessed with a debit card or transferred to a bank account.

The app can reduce the use of payday loans, with exorbitant borrowing rates, as workers have access to funds between pay periods. Instant Financial makes money from fees charged employers and merchants when debit cards are used; although employees may pay ATM fees.

A major concern of the app is that it might discourage long-term financial planning. Poor budgeting habits could result in increased use of debt due to a lack of funds at the end of the month. Employees who use the app are encouraged to practice wise money management, including creating and building an emergency fund and other savings.

For additional information on instant pay, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students talk with others about the benefits and drawbacks of an instant account.
  • Have students describe two situations: (1) a person who used the instant account wisely, and (2) someone who mismanaged their money as a result of using the instant account.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What factors might be considered when deciding whether or not to use an instant account?
  2. Describe how an instant account might result in improved money management and in weakened money management activities.

The Slacker’s Guide to Saving for Retirement

Whether retirement is coming soon or feels far away, it’s something you need to think about.

This article encourages students to make retirement planning a part of their budget and one of their financial goals.   It also points out the benefits of starting early—even if students can contribute only a small amount because of other obligations that include paying off student loans and other debt obligations, paying rent, buying groceries, and establishing an emergency fund.

A very good suggestion included in this article is to start by saving just $25 from each paycheck, and then increase the amount until someone feels they have reached a limit they are comfortable with.

Other suggestions include participating in a 401(k) account at work and using bonuses and salary increases to boost the amount contributed to your retirement account.

For more information, go to

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/slackers-guide-saving-retirement-113005671.html

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Encourage students to develop a long-term financial plan that includes retirement goals.
  • Discuss time value of money examples that show how small dollar amounts invested on a regular basis can help achieve long-term financial goals.
  • Launch a discussion about the different types of retirement accounts.

Discussion Questions

1.  Many people never begin saving or investing because there is never anything left over at the end of the month.  How can you find the money needed to begin saving and investing?

2.  Why should you begin to save for retirement now instead of waiting until later in life?