SECOND CHANCE BANKING

Several groups in our society are unable to open a checking account and access other banking services because of past life circumstances.  To help address this situation, financial service providers are offering second chance banking. This program is designed to provide financial opportunities to unbanked individuals and formerly incarcerated people.

Second chance banking involves a special checking account that doesn’t require a background check of a person’s past banking history. This account has limited features to minimize potential fees and no minimum balance. For those who lack a US ID or Social Security number, a foreign ID or passport is accepted to access this service.

A major goal of second chance accounts is to build banking credibility.  Once reliability is demonstrated over time, a person is then able to open a regular checking account. These accounts have a positive impact in low-income communities, where customers traditionally pay higher bank fees resulting in their account often being closed by the financial institution due to overdrafts.

In addition to making banking available to unbanked and underbanked consumers,

second chance banking also serves as an important step in financial freedom for formerly incarcerated people. A high percentage of these individuals were unbanked prior to their confinement, lack proper identification, or denied banking services due to their criminal history. Some who previously had an account may have had it closed due to inactivity or extensive fees.

The program also involves financial education to help a person build credit, save money, and achieve financial independence. A wide variety of banks, credit unions, community development financial institutions, minority depository institutions, and community-based non-profits are involved in second chance banking.

For additional information on second chance banking, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students talk to others to learn about difficulties they may have encountered with banking services.
  • Have students create a visual summary (poster or slide presentation) to communicate how banking services are related to successful money management and financial planning.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What are benefits of second chance banking for individuals, their community, and society?
  2. Describe actions you would recommend to a person in need of obtaining a bank account. 

THE NEW “BUY NOW, PAY LATER”

For a long time, “buy now, pay later” (BNPL) has referred to the use of credit. However, recently a new BNPL approach has surfaced, and is growing. Today, financial technology (FinTech) companies are using a different method to finance consumer purchases.

BNPL providers include Affirm, Afterpay, Klarna, Zip, and PayPal. The BNPL plan allows consumers to obtain a purchase immediately and then make a series of equal payments, often four payments each due two weeks apart. The first payment is due at the time of purchase.

Most BNPL plans charge interest and late fees. These plans often offer financing to customers with bad credit or no credit. BNPL is used mainly for online shopping although the plan is also available in some stores. Purchases of technology, furniture, clothing, beauty care products, groceries, health care services, and to eat at restaurants are the most common uses of BNPL.

The main benefits of BNPL mentioned by consumers, include to:

  • spread cost of expensive items over time.
  • buy items that they might not otherwise be able to afford.
  • avoid credit card debt.
  • try out the BNPL method.
  • not have to wait until payday to buy an item.

When selecting a BNPL plan, search for those with low or no interest and low or no late fees. Remember when using BNPL, you are still taking on debt. This easy access to credit often results in overspending. Some people will make purchases through multiple plans resulting in greater financial difficulties.

Be sure you can pay on time to avoid late fees and interest charges. Unlike traditional loans, BNPL providers may not report to credit bureaus, so you are not building a credit record.

For additional information on BNPL, click on these articles:

Article #1

Article #2

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students ask if any friends or relatives have used a BNPL plan. Obtain information about their experiences.
  • Have students create a visual poster, slide presentation, or video with the benefits and drawbacks of BNPL plans.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What aspects of BNPL might create financial difficulties?
  2. Describe actions a person might take to evaluate a BNPL plan.

Tips To Avoid Internet Scams

Each day, more and more scams surface through computers, tablets, cellphones, and other smart devices. To protect your personal information and to avoid being a victim of fraud, the following actions are recommended:

  • Keep operating systems, browsers, programs, apps, and security components up to date.
  • Be aware of the latest scam techniques being used by fraudsters. Search online to learn about current scams.
  • Enable firewalls for your computer and router.
  • Install an antivirus program for your computer, tablet, and smartphone that updates automatically.
  • Create a guest network for visitors to your home to use, to avoid them having to access your home network.
  • Don’t click or respond to emails, phone calls, or text messages from strange addresses and those with unusual subject lines.
  • Update passwords often with a random, complex series of letters, numbers, and symbols; don’t use the same password on different sites. Consider use of a password manager. 
  • Use only reputable sites when shopping online. Use a credit card instead of a debit card for greater financial protection. Don’t click on links or pop-ups, which can be a fake, look-alike website; instead, go directly to the shopping website.
  • Adjust privacy settings on your devices, and for websites you visit for your best protection.  
  • Regularly back up your data in case of a malicious attack, so you don’t lose access to your information and files. If you encounter a ransomware attack, file a report with the FBI.
  • Avoid use of public Wi-Fi to prevent potential fraud and identity theft.
  • Be cautious with your social media posts, especially information about children and teens. Don’t post personal information, vacation plans, work and home schedules, address or other contact information. Don’t “check in” at the locations you visit. 
  • Be cautious about online gaming, which can result in identity theft, bullying, harassment and online predators. Children should use an avatar or nickname.

For additional information on avoiding online scams, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students search online for examples of recently-created online scams.
  • Have students create a video, poster, or slide presentation with common email scams and actions to avoid those situations.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What are some reasons that a person might become a victim of an online scam?
  2. Describe actions to learn about new online scams. 

SELECTING AN ONLINE BANK

More and more bank customers are using online financial-service providers. Online-only (digital) banks provide traditional financial services in an online format.  FinTech companies (neobanks) offer innovative banking services with an emphasis on emerging technology, often through apps.

When deciding which online bank to use, consider these factors:

  • FDIC Insurance, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) covers deposit accounts against bank failure up to $250,000 per depositor and type of ownership category. To determine if a bank is protected by the FDIC, go to https://banks.data.fdic.gov/bankfind-suite/bankfind
  • Fee-free ATMs, to avoid costly charges. Many online banks have an extensive network of ATMs, while others do not have ATM access.
  • High-yield savings accounts, with lower operating costs many online banks offer savings accounts with higher yields. Be sure to compare the rates, rules, and regulations at various online banks, such as the required minimum deposit and minimum balance. 
  • Multiple banking products, depending on your goals and needs, you might choose a bank that offers an array of financial services–checking, saving, CDs, debit card, ATMs, credit card, and loans.
  • Financial management tools, FinTech apps and online banks offer innovative financial planning tools to help you save money, such as with a round-up savings component, automatic savings deposits, and low-cost investment funds. Other apps include features for achieving goals to pay off debts or save for a vacation, or savings based on your spending patterns.
  • Investment guidance, robo-advisors provide portfolio suggestions based on financial goals and risk tolerance with the use of artificial intelligence. 

For additional information on selecting an online bank, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students talk to others to learn about factors that were considered when selecting a bank or other financial-service provider.
  • Have students create a visual proposal (poster, slide presentation, or other format) to highlight the main factors to consider when selecting an online bank.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What online banking features could help a person improve their financial position?
  2. Describe actions a person might take to select an online bank. 

FINTECH AND FINANCIAL WELLNESS

MoneyLion offers a low-cost financial service tool that integrates investing, banking, lending, and financial wellness. Using the brand name RoarMoney, the company also offers a virtual debit card for contactless payments and Instacash with a free overdraft service.  With Money Lion’s Shake N’ Bank program, customers earn cash every time they spend $10 or more with their bank card. To determine the amount they get back, users literally shake their phones and a random amount up to $120 shows up.

To guide financial wellness, the Financial Heartbeat program of MoneyLion rates customers from 1 to 10 on these categories:

1) Save measures financial preparedness; how well a person can pay expected and unexpected expenses. 

2) Spend measures purchasing in relation income available.

3) Shield determines how well you understand and organize your insurance needs and coverages.

4) Score creates a Bottom of Formcredit score to assess overall credit health based on debt usage and interest rates paid.

For additional information on FinTech and financial wellness, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students talk to others to learn about the features of banking and money management apps they have used.
  • Have students create a visual proposal (poster or slide presentation) for an app that would help people better manage their money and improve their financial wellness.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What features of an app or FinTech product might help people improve their financial wellness?
  2. Describe actions a person might take to evaluate an app or FinTech product.  

What to Do When Information Is Lost or Exposed

What to Do When Information Is Lost or Exposed

Did you recently get a notice informing you that your personal information was exposed in a data breach? Did you lose your wallet? Or learn that an online account was hacked? Depending on what information was lost, there are steps you can take to help protect yourself from identity theft

What information was lost or exposed?

  1. Social Security number
  • If a company responsible for exposing your information offers you free credit monitoring, take advantage of it.
  • Get your free credit reports from annualcreditreport.com. Check for any accounts or charges you don’t recognize.
  • Consider placing a free credit freeze. A credit freeze makes it harder for someone to open a new account in your name.
  • Try to file your taxes early — before a scammer can. Tax identity theft happens when someone uses your Social Security number to get a tax refund or a job.
  • Respond right away to letters from the IRS.  Don’t believe anyone who calls and says you’ll be arrested unless you pay for taxes or debt.
  • Continue to check your credit reports at annualcreditreport.com.  You can order a free report from each of the three credit reporting companies once a year.
  1. Online login or password
  • Log in to that account and change your password. If possible, also change your user name. If you can’t log in, contact the company. Ask them how you can recover or shut down the account.

3. Debit or credit card number

  • Contact your bank or credit card company to cancel your card and request a new one.
  • Review your transactions regularly. Make sure no one misused your card. If you find fraudulent charges, call the fraud department and get them removed.
  • If you have automatic payments set up, update them with your new card number.
  • Check your credit report at annualcreditreport.com.

4. Bank account information

  • Contact your bank to close the account and open a new one.
  • Review your transactions regularly to make sure no one misused your account. If you find fraudulent charges or withdrawals, call the fraud department and get them removed.
  • If you have automatic payments set up, update them with your new bank account information.
  1. Driver’s license information
  • Contact your nearest motor vehicles branch to report a lost or stolen driver’s license. The state might flag your license number in case someone else tries to use it, or they might suggest that you apply for a duplicate.
  • Check your credit report at annualcreditreport.com.

 

For More Information, click here.

Teaching Suggestions:

  • Ask how many students check their credit report at least once a year. What is the importance of checking your credit report regularly?
  • Ask if any student has placed a credit freeze. If so, what was their experience?

Discussion Questions:

  1. What is the difference between a credit freeze and a fraud alert?
  2. What must you do if someone uses your Social Security number to get a tax refund?

Warning Signs of Identity Theft

What Do Thieves Do With Your Information?

 Once identity thieves have your personal information, they can drain your bank account, run up charges on your credit cards, open new utility accounts, or get medical treatment on your health insurance. An identity thief can file a tax refund in your name and get your refund. In some extreme cases, a thief might even give your name to the police during an arrest.

Here are clues that someone has stolen your information:

  • You see withdrawals from your bank account that you can’t explain.
  • You don’t get your bills or other mail.
  • Merchants refuse your checks.
  • Debt collectors call you about debts that aren’t yours.
  • You find unfamiliar accounts or charges on your credit report.
  • Medical providers bill you for services you didn’t use.
  • Your health plan rejects your legitimate medical claim because the records show you’ve reached your benefits limit.
  • A health plan won’t cover you because your medical records show a condition you don’t have.
  • The IRS notifies you that more than one tax return was filed in your name, or that you have income from an employer you don’t work for.
  • You get notice that your information was compromised by a data breach at a company where you do business or have an account.

For more information, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Ask students if they, their family members or friends have been victims of an identity theft. What was their experience and how did they resolve the problem?
  • Ask students if they mail bills from their home mail box, especially if it is out by the street. What might be some dangers of this method of mailing bills?

Discussion Questions

  1. Should you put your Social Security and driver’s license numbers on your checks?   Why or why not?
  2. Why is it important to check your credit report each year? Should you consider credit monitoring, identity monitoring service, or identity theft insurance?  Why or why not?

Beware of scams related to the coronavirus

Scammers are taking advantage of the corona virus (COVID-19) pandemic to con people into giving up their money. Though the reason behind their fraud is new, their tactics are familiar. It can be even harder to prevent scams right now because people aren’t interacting with as many friends, neighbors, and senior service providers due to efforts to slow the spread of disease.

Those who are ill or don’t feel comfortable potentially exposing themselves may need someone to help with errands. Be cautious when accepting offers of help and use trusted delivery services for supplies and food. During this time of uncertainty, knowing about possible scams is a good first step toward preventing them.

  1. Scams offering COVID-19 vaccine, cure, air filters, testing

There is an increasing number of scams related to vaccines, test kits, cures or treatments, and air filter systems designed to remove COVID-19 from the air in your home. At the time of this writing, there is neither a vaccine nor a cure for this virus. If you receive a phone call, email, text message, or letter with claims to sell you any of these items–it’s a scam.

  1. Fake corona virus-related charity scams

A thief poses as a real charity or makes up the name of a charity that sounds real to get money from you. Be careful about any charity calling you asking for donations. If you are able to help financially, visit the website of the organization of your choice to make sure your money is going to the right place. And be wary if you get a call following up on a donation pledge that you don’t remember making–it could be a scam.

  1. “Person in need” scams

Scammers use the circumstances of the corona virus to pose as a grandchild, relative or friend who claims to be ill, stranded in another state or foreign country, or otherwise in trouble, and asks you to send money. The scammer may ask you to send cash by mail or buy gift cards. These scammers often beg you to keep it a secret and act fast before you ask questions. Don’t panic!  Don’t send money unless you’re sure it’s the real person who contacted you. Hang up and call your grandchild or friend’s phone number to see if the story checks out. You could also call a different friend or relative to check the caller’s story.

  1. Scams targeting your Social Security benefits

Local Social Security Administration (SSA) offices are closed to the public due to COVID-19 concerns, SSA will not suspend or decrease  Social Security benefit payments or Supplemental Security Income payments due to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Scammers may mislead people into believing they need to provide personal information or pay by gift card, wire transfer, internet currency, or by mailing cash to maintain regular benefit payments during this period. Any communication that says SSA will suspend or decrease your benefits due to COVID-19 is a scam, whether you receive it by letter, text, email, or phone call. Report Social Security scams to the SSA Inspector General online at oig.ssa.gov .

For more information, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Ask students if they, their friends, or relatives have been victims of coronavirus- related scams? If so, what was their experience?
  • Someone you don’t know contacts you asking for any personally identifiable information by phone, in person, by text message, or email. What will be your response?

Discussion Questions

  1. Someone you don’t know sends you a check, maybe prize-winnings or the sale of goods and asks you to send a portion of the money back. What will you do and why?
  2. Discuss the statement: “The federal. State, and local consumer protection agencies are doing everything possible to protect consumers from fraudsters”.

DON’T KEEP THESE THINGS IN YOUR WALLET

While no one plans to lose their wallet, you can reduce the trauma of that event. Consumer protection experts recommend not keeping these items in your wallet:

  • your Social Security card; also make sure nothing else in your wallet contains your Social Security number.
  • a list of passwords; keep the list secured at home, and consider use of a password manager.
  • spare keys; a lost wallet with keys and your home address on an ID card is an invitation to burglars.
  • blank checks; while few people write checks, blank checks are risky as a thief has your account number and the bank routing numbers and probably your home address. 
  • your passport or passport card; an identity thief could travel under your name, obtain a copy of your Social Security card, or open a bank account. Whenever traveling on a passport, keep a copy in a safe place.
  • extra credit cards; carry only one or two cards to avoid having to cancel many cards if your wallet is lost or stolen.
  • other items to keep out of your wallet: birth certificate; receipts that could be used to by skilled identity thieves; an old Medicare card with your Social Security number; and gift cards, which could be used by anyone with access to your wallet.

By following these guidelines, you can avoid identity theft, bogus loan applications in your name, and someone opening fraudulent accounts. Also recommended: photocopy the front and back of the items in your wallet to have a record of what is lost or stolen.

For additional information on what not to keep in your wallet, click here:

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students talk to others to determine if they carry any of these items in their wallet.
  • Have students create a checklist of action to take if your wallet is lost or stolen.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What are actions people can take to avoid identity theft?
  2. Describe how technology and apps are replacing traditional wallets. Discuss how these devices might improve security against identity theft.

Giving A 6-Year-Old A Debit Card to Teach Wise Spending…Really!!

Kids are no longer using a piggy bank to obtain financial responsibility. Instead, digital tools, such as debit cards and apps, are the basis for learning smart spending and wise money management.  Many of these products are prepaid cards that help kids track their spending, and also include customizable oversight features for parents.  Some available products include:

  • FamZoo (famzoo.com) makes use of parent-paid interest to encourage saving. Common users of the app are preteen and young teenagers, but may also be used for kids from preschool to college.
  • Greenlight (greenlightcard.com) allows parents to control the stores at which the debit card can be used. Greenlight plans to introduce an investing feature to move users to a higher level of financial literacy.
  • gohenry (gohenry.com) is an app for kids (ages 8 to 18), but may be used by younger children. The emphasis is on building money management confidence in a safe setting while learning to spend and save.
  • Current (current.com) is a custodial bank account aimed at teenagers. Parents may also open accounts for younger children.

These products allow parents to channel digital funds to their children to pay weekly allowances. Also, kids may divide their money into accounts for saving, spending, and donating to charity.  Most apps have a monthly fee, ranging from $3 to $5.

When using prepaid debit cards with children, consider the following:

  • Spend time talking about why the kids want to buy various items, and why certain household tasks earn money and others do not. Expand the Connect the discussion to talk about total family finances as well as money attitudes and values.
  • Allow freedom to make spending decisions to give kids experience at managing money, and to make mistakes from which they will learn.
  • Ask older kids to buy household items, even though they might be reimbursed. Buying shampoo, toothpaste, and snacks will prepare them for when they are on their own. Also consider billing them for monthly expenses, such as the cost of their cell phone.

For additional information on prepaid debit cards for kids, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students conduct online research to evaluate apps that might be used by parents to teach their children smart spending and wise money management.
  • Have students talk to parents to obtain suggestions that might be used to teach wise money management to children.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What are the financial, social, and relational benefits of children learning smart spending and wise money management early in life?
  2. Describe some possible money management learning activities for children that do not involve the use of technology.