Common Credit Report Errors

What are common credit report errors that you should look for on your credit report?  When reviewing your credit report, check that it contains items about you.  Be sure to look for information that is inaccurate or incomplete.

Some common errors in credit reports are:

Identity errors

  • Errors made to your identity information (wrong name, phone number, address)
  • Accounts belonging to another person with the same name or similar name as yours (this mixing of two consumer’s information in a single file is called mixed file)
  • Incorrect accounts resulting from Identity theft

Incorrect reporting of account status

  • Closed accounts reported as open
  • You are reported as the owner of the account, when you are actually just an authorized user
  • Accounts that are incorrectly reported as late or delinquent
  • Incorrect date of last payment, date opened, or date of first delinquency
  • Same debt listed more than once (possibly with different names)

Data management errors

  • Reinsertion of incorrect information after it was corrected
  • Accounts that appear multiple times with different creditors listed (especially in the case of delinquent accounts or accounts in collection)

Balance Errors

  • Accounts with an incorrect current balance
  • Accounts with an incorrect credit limit

For more information, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Why is important to check your credit reports every year?
  • Credit bureaus are required to follow reasonable procedures to ensure that your credit report is accurate, then why mistakes may occur?
  • Ask students if they have ever been contacted a credit bureau to dispute the accuracy of its information. What was the outcome?

Discussion Questions

  1. When you notify the credit bureau that you dispute the accuracy of its information, what must the credit bureau do to rectify mistakes?
  2. What are your legal remedies if a consumer reporting agency fails to comply with the provisions of the Fair Credit Reporting Act?

Disputing an Error in Your Credit Report

If you find an error in a report from a credit reporting agency, you may submit a dispute not only to the credit reporting agency, but also directly to the company that is the source of the information. If the company corrects your information as a result of your dispute, it must notify all of the credit reporting agencies to which it provided the inaccurate information, so they can update their reports with the correct information.

If you submit a dispute by mail, your dispute letter should include your complete name, address, telephone number, your confirmation number (if available), and the account number.  Clearly identify each mistake, state the facts, explain why you are disputing the information, and request that it be removed or corrected.

You may want to enclose a copy of the portion of your credit report that contains the disputed items and circle or highlight the disputed items.  You should include copies (not originals) of documents that support your position.  Send your letter by certified mail and ask for a return receipt, so that you will have a record that you letter was received.

For more information, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Ask students to request their own credit report and check for any errors.
  • Ask students to draft a letter of complaint if they find any errors in their credit report.

Discussion Questions

  1. Where else can consumers submit a credit reporting complaint?
  2. If you suspect that error in your credit report as a result of an identity theft, what steps can you take to protect yourself?

The Credit Card Mistake That’s Costing Millenials

“A new survey from BMO Harris Bank shows consumers are confused on how credit card balances affect credit scores. . .”

While using a credit card is one of the easiest ways to build credit, there are plenty of misconceptions about how best to do that.  According to this survey

  • 39 percent of Millennials—people between ages 18 to 34—believe carrying a balance increases their credit scores. In fact, carrying a balance does not improve credit scores and can actually hurt scores.
  • 23 percent of those surveyed indicated that a person’s educational level affects his or her credit score. In fact, a credit score is based only on the information in your credit report, and educational level is not included in your credit report.
  • 27 percent of those surveyed thought checking their credit scores would lower their credit score. In fact, the opposite is true:  If you regularly check your credit scores, it’s likely you’ll make financial decisions that will improve your credit score.

For more information go to

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Discuss why a credit score is important.
  • Stress the importance of “managing” credit card debt.

Discussion Questions

  1. What affect will your credit score have on the finance charges you pay for credit purchases?
  2. How can your credit score affect your ability to purchase a home or an automobile?
  3. Assume you have a low credit score and have been turned down for a home mortgage. What steps can you take to increase your credit score?

Is Your Credit Card Denied By Mistake?

When your credit card issuer suspects fraudulent activity on your credit card, it triggers a red flag to deny the charge.  Generally, it is a great protection.  But if you are making the purchase and not a thief, it can be frustrating.  Some purchase patterns that could cause your purchase to be denied include:

  • A purchase for a small dollar amount, followed by a large purchase. Credit card thieves sometimes make a small dollar “test purchase” followed by big ticket items, so this raises a red flag.
  • Multiple purchases back-to-back in a short span of time.
  • Making purchases in a new city, in a different part of town, or in stores where you do not normally shop.

Though inconvenient, these protections are to keep you from being a victim of fraud.  Take these steps to prevent or deal with a credit card purchase being denied by mistake:

  • Inform your credit card company if you will be using your card out of town (especially internationally).
  • Update your billing address if you move, so that the company recognizes the new pattern of purchases as a new normal.
  • Make sure the company has your cell phone number so that it can contact you faster to verify or authorize a purchase.
  • Contact your credit company immediately if your purchase is denied.

For more information go to

Teaching Suggestions

  • Ask students if their credit card was ever denied in error.
  • If the transaction was denied, how did they resolve the problem.

Discussion Questions

  1. What are a few reasons that your credit card purchase might be denied?
  2. What can you do to avoid such an embarrassment at the check-out counter?

Learning about High-Cost Financial Services

Brian Page, a teacher in Reading Ohio, wants his students to understand the drawbacks of check-cashing services, pawnshops, rent-to-own stores, payday loans, and other shadow banking services.  As a result, he scheduled a field trip for his students to visit these sources of high-cost financial services in their community, which are used by many unbanked consumers.

At LoanMax, they observed people getting loans with their auto titles serving as collateral.  One missed payment could lead to repossession of the vehicle. Next, at CheckSmart, students learned about payday lending and tax refund anticipation loans.

At CashAmerica people were making loan payments on money borrowed, which used jewelry, electronics, and sports memorabilia as collateral. Finally, the visit to the Rent-A-Center store demonstrated the exorbitant costs of furniture, appliances, and electronics when using a rent-to-own payment program.

For additional information on teaching about high-cost financial services, go to:

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students talk with someone who has used one of these high-cost financial services. Obtain information about their experiences.
  • If appropriate, have students visit a high-cost financial service provider to obtain information about their services and fees.
  • Have students create a video presentation with suggestions on how to avoid using costly sources of financial services.

Discussion Questions 

  1. Why are an increasing number of people using high-cost financial services such as pawnshop loans, payday loans, and rent-to-own programs?
  2. What alternatives might used by consumers instead of these high-cost financial services?
  3. What actions might a person take to avoid these high-cost financial services?

Billing Errors on Your Credit Card Statement

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s Response Center reports that billing disputes and error resolution problems and processes are the most common types of complaints it received in 2012 and 2013 related to credit cards.  And, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, many consumers are confused and frustrated by the process of challenging inaccuracies on their monthly statements.

Checking your statements periodically also can help you monitor your spending.  You may want to sign up for alerts on your mobile phone or through your email that inform you when your credit card has hit a specific balance amount or you are close to your credit limit.  Other alerts can remind you about an upcoming bill.

If you notice a billing error, such as an unauthorized charge on your statement, contact the card issuer as soon as possible.

 For additional information and guidance, see consumer information from the Federal Trade Commission at


Discussion Questions

1.  What might be some reasons for consumers to be confused and frustrated by the process of challenging inaccuracies on their monthly statements?

2.  What are advantages of checking your monthly credit card statements?

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the FTC website to

  • Have students make a short presentation with a summary of actions that might be taken to report billing errors to the credit card issuer and other federal consumer protection agencies.
  • Draft a sample letter to dispute a billing error.
  • Review the Fair Credit Billing Act to learn about protecting  their rights if  a billing error occurs.

Choosing a Credit Card? Ensure that Your Credit Report is Accurate

Correcting inaccuracies in your credit report may help you improve your credit history and credit score, which credit card issuers consider when deciding whether to offer you a card and how they will determine your interest rate and credit limit. You also can find out if an identity thief has opened credit cards or other accounts in your name.

By federal law, you are entitled to one free copy of your credit report every twelve months from each of the three major nationwide consumer reporting agencies (also called “credit bureaus”)—Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Each company issues its own report, and because some lender do not provide information to all three of them, it’s useful to request your report from each one in order to get a comprehensive view of you credit history.

For additional information, go to;;;

Discussion Questions

1. Why is it important to check your credit reports every year?

2. Why should you request a credit report from each one of the three credit bureaus?


Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog and the above websites to discuss

* What should students do if they find inaccuracies in their credit reports?

* Have students draft a letter to the credit bureau to correct the errors in their credit report.